FireEye Blog

Threat Research, Analysis, and Mitigation

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Bring Your Own Land (BYOL) – A Novel Red Teaming Technique Introduction One of most significant recent developments in sophisticated offensive operations is the use of “Living off the Land” (LotL) techniques by attackers. These techniques leverage legitimate tools present on the system, such as the PowerShell scripting language, in order to execute attacks. The popularity of PowerShell as an offensive tool culminated in the development of entire Red Team frameworks based around it, such as Empire and PowerSploit. In addition, the execution of PowerShell can be obfuscated through the use of tools such as “Invoke-Obfuscation”. In ...
A Totally Tubular Treatise on TRITON and TriStation Introduction In December 2017, FireEye's Mandiant discussed an incident response involving the TRITON framework. The TRITON attack and many of the publicly discussed ICS intrusions involved routine techniques where the threat actors used only what is necessary to succeed in their mission. For both INDUSTROYER and TRITON, the attackers moved from the IT network to the OT (operational technology) network through systems that were accessible to both environments. Traditional malware backdoors, Mimikatz distillates, remote desktop sessions, and other well-documented, easily-dete...
Reverse Engineering the Analyst: Building Machine Learning Models for the SOC Many cyber incidents can be traced back to an original alert that was either missed or ignored by the Security Operations Center (SOC) or Incident Response (IR) team. While most analysts and SOCs are vigilant and responsive, the fact is they are often overwhelmed with alerts. If a SOC is unable to review all the alerts it generates, then sooner or later, something important will slip through the cracks. The core issue here is scalability. It is far easier to create more alerts than to create more analysts, and the cyber security industry is far better at alert generation than re...
How the Rise of Cryptocurrencies Is Shaping the Cyber Crime Landscape: Blockchain Infrastructure Use UPDATE (May 31, 2018): A section of the post on commonly used OpenNIC IPs has been removed to avoid any implication that the OpenNIC IPs are inherently malicious, which is not the case. Introduction Cyber criminals have always been attracted to cryptocurrencies because it provides a certain level of anonymity and can be easily monetized. This interest has increased in recent years, stemming far beyond the desire to simply use cryptocurrencies as a payment method for illicit tools and services. Many actors have also attempted to capitalize on the growing popularity and subse...
Remote Authentication GeoFeasibility Tool - GeoLogonalyzer Users have long needed to access important resources such as virtual private networks (VPNs), web applications, and mail servers from anywhere in the world at any time. While the ability to access resources from anywhere is imperative for employees, threat actors often leverage stolen credentials to access systems and data. Due to large volumes of remote access connections, it can be difficult to distinguish between a legitimate and a malicious login. Today, we are releasing GeoLogonalyzer to help organizations analyze logs to identify malicious logins based on GeoFeasibility;...
A Deep Dive Into RIG Exploit Kit Delivering Grobios Trojan As discussed in previous blogs, exploit kit activity has been on the decline since the latter half of 2016. However, we do still periodically observe significant developments in this space, and we have been observing interesting ongoing activity involving RIG Exploit Kit (EK). Although the volume of its traffic observed in-the-wild has been on the decline, RIG EK remains active, with a wide range of associated crimeware payloads. In this recent finding, RIG EK was observed delivering a Trojan named Grobios. This blog post will discuss this Trojan in depth with a focus on its...
New Targeted Attack in the Middle East by APT34, a Suspected Iranian Threat Group, Using CVE-2017-11882 Exploit Less than a week after Microsoft issued a patch for CVE-2017-11882 on Nov. 14, 2017, FireEye observed an attacker using an exploit for the Microsoft Office vulnerability to target a government organization in the Middle East. We assess this activity was carried out by a suspected Iranian cyber espionage threat group, whom we refer to as APT34, using a custom PowerShell backdoor to achieve its objectives. We believe APT34 is involved in a long-term cyber espionage operation largely focused on reconnaissance efforts to benefit Iranian nation-state interests and has been operationa...
Behind the CARBANAK Backdoor In this blog, we will take a closer look at the powerful, versatile backdoor known as CARBANAK (aka Anunak). Specifically, we will focus on the operational details of its use over the past few years, including its configuration, the minor variations observed from sample to sample, and its evolution. With these details, we will then draw some conclusions about the operators of CARBANAK. For some additional background on the CARBANAK backdoor, see the papers by Kaspersky and Group-IB and Fox-It. Technical Analysis Before we dive into the meat of this blog, a brief technical ...
Rooting a Logitech Harmony Hub: Improving Security in Today's IoT World Introduction FireEye’s Mandiant Red Team recently discovered vulnerabilities present on the Logitech Harmony Hub Internet of Things (IoT) device that could potentially be exploited, resulting in root access to the device via SSH. The Harmony Hub is a home control system designed to connect to and control a variety of devices in the user’s home. Exploitation of these vulnerabilities from the local network could allow an attacker to control the devices linked to the Hub as well as use the Hub as an execution space to attack other devices on the local network. As the Harmony Hu...
FLARE VM: The Windows Malware Analysis Distribution You’ve Always Needed! UPDATE (April 26, 2018): The web installer method to deploy FLARE VM is now deprecated. Please refer to the README on the FLARE VM GitHub for the most up-to-date installation instructions. As a reverse engineer on the FLARE Team I rely on a customized Virtual Machine (VM) to perform malware analysis. The Virtual Machine is a Windows installation with numerous tweaks and tools to aid my analysis. Unfortunately trying to maintain a custom VM like this is very laborious: tools frequently get out of date and it is hard to change or add new things. There is also a constant fear...